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Movie Cameras

Movie cameras come from many different brands such as ARRI, Bolex, Canon, and Kodak. For a budding filmmaker, these cameras come equipped with a wide array of features, such as manual foci and zoom lenses, that you can use to create any kind of movie or short film that you wish. These video cameras can shoot in several different types of film, allowing you to record video in the exact style and look that you want to emulate.

Which film formats do these cameras shoot in?

When you are selecting one of these cameras, you will be provided with a wide array of formats that you can shoot in, depending on quality, each of which is slightly different from the others and comes with its own benefits that might assist you in selecting one over another. Some of these devices support just one type of film while others support a variety.

  • 8mm: This is the most common film stock that you can use when shooting movies and is known for providing a standard frame rate of 16 frames per second. When the video has finished being shot, it is displayed in a common 16:9 aspect ratio.
  • Super 8: First introduced in the mid-1960s, Super 8 film is packaged in plastic cartridges and comes with a straightforward loading technique. The frame rate available with this type ranges from 18-24 frames per second.
  • 16mm: This is commonly used in the creation of home movies and provides you with an expanded picture area that is notable for offering a wider aspect ratio.
  • 35mm: This is a favorite among movie directors who wish to eschew digital filmmaking as it offers high resolution, expansive depth of field, and precise angle views.
What do the different types of film cameras mean?

When you wish to engage in some filmmaking and editing, there are a few types of cameras that you should be aware of as each offers a different take on shooting movies.

  • Reflex: This type of model allows you to look directly through the lens to see exactly what you are going to be filming.
  • Non-reflex: This model provides you with a viewfinder to look through as you are recording, allowing you to get an approximate view at what the image will look like once it is recorded.
  • Zoom reflex: These models provide varying zoom levels that you can use to hone in on an object by manually changing the lens settings.
What are some features of these film cameras?

These devices can come with substantial feature sets and sensors, depending on the model you select. Most come with auto-exposure features that handle all of the exposure settings for you, allowing you to focus on other aspects of the shots. Some are equipped with electric drives that allow for more effective filming. Many models are outfitted with built-in light meters that measure the low light conditions that are currently in the shots and provide you with accurate readings.




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