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DJ Microphones

Types of DJ Microphones

Traditionally, DJs have used either dynamic or condenser microphones. Dynamic microphones are reliable for beginners as they can capture voices even at high sound pressure levels. Due to their unique design, these microphones can be used easily without unwanted distortion from the surrounding noise or musical instruments.

In contrast, condenser microphones incorporate a thin conductive diaphragm close to a metal back plate. Since these mics use capacitance instead of the moving coils, sound quality is often better than the dynamic mic in a closed environment; however, if the sound pressure levels are higher, then it's better to use dynamic microphones.

Wired vs. wireless DJ microphone

The decision to select a wired or wireless microphone should depend on your individual requirements. For instance, it's well-known that wired mics and stand mics such as Shure SM58 are standard across the industry. On the other hand, any comparable wireless microphone is probably at least three times as expensive as most benchmark wired DJ microphones. While the sound quality is not an issue anymore, most wired microphones offer a more dynamic range to play with your voice.

In contrast, if you don't want to deal with plenty of cables or if you need to move consistently, a wireless microphone will do the job. When using a wireless microphone, you don't need to worry about battery drainage and setting up complicated connections. In fact, the plug-and-play technology makes it easier for DJs to start working as soon as they buy the wireless microphone.

Despite the flexibility of a wireless mic or lapel mics, DJs should remember that wireless microphones need to work on certain frequencies. Just make sure that you know what frequencies to use in another country because it can be a hassle to use wireless microphones in countries that use different frequencies.

When should you use a ribbon microphone?

Ribbon microphones became very popular in the 1950s and 1960s. Just like most things in those days, these stand-alone and headset mics were well built and offered great sound quality when sitting inside a recording studio. Nowadays, they are making a comeback as they can offer good quality sound in an acoustic environment. They are also great for a vintage vibe and can relay a variety of ambient sounds. If you regularly do vintage music or use instruments such as vocals, choirs, piano, strings, and woodwind, ribbon microphones can be a great asset.









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