Got one to sell?

Get it in front of 160+ million buyers.

Golf Clubs

Golf is a sport that's enjoyed by fans and players of all ages. To play, golfers need a variety of clubs, such as irons to hit the ball toward the hole, wood clubs for making long-distance tee shots, and putters to roll the ball into the hole. There are a number of golf sets that can provide the assortment of clubs you need.

Why should you choose golf clubs in iron sets?

Iron clubs are made of metal with thin heads. The club faces are forged to create spin on the ball. While professional players prefer the blade or muscle-back style of iron, most recreational golfers and beginners will use a cavity-back style. A cavity back is hollowed out while a blade style features a full back on the club’s rear.

How many golf clubs are in an iron set?

An off-the-shelf iron set will contain a 3-iron, pitching wedge, and eight irons, each identified by a number. The exception is the pitching wedge, which has a “P” or “PW” on the irons. Other iron clubs may be available separately to create an iron set, including the 2-iron and additional lob, gap, and sand wedges.

Blended or hybrid iron sets are often part of the iron set in place of long irons. As you go through the iron set from the 3-iron to the pitching wedge, each iron has slightly more loft than the previous and a shaft a little shorter. From the 3-iron to pitching wedge, each golf iron hits the ball from a shorter distance than the previous one.

Sometimes, your handle may break. If this happens, you need to decide whether to repair or replace it. You can also upgrade the entire iron set. There some factors to consider when choosing a new handle for your irons.

How do you choose a new shaft for your golf clubs?

When deciding on irons, you'll notice that some have smaller heads and shorter shafts compared to woods. The heads of irons are forged from steel or solid iron and have large, angled-faced, and flat features. Irons are also used in various situations like teeing, on the fairway, and removing the ball from hazards.

  • Try a graphite or steel golf handle to determine which best suits your swing.
  • Look at the shaft flex and the required bend point or kickpoint.
  • Find the right torque rating for the handle.
  • Finally, get the optimal length for the iron when it's finished.
Tell us what you think - opens in new window or tab