How can you determine the value of an autograph?


Begin by determining the availability of the autograph to establish how rare or how common it is. Next, evaluate the autograph format; a signed item may have more value if it is on a unique base. Small pieces of paper and cards have lesser value than important documents, rare photos, and garments. Study the autograph's condition, and verify its authenticity by paying a professional to evaluate and vouch for it. With all of that information on hand, look for similar autographs that match yours, and determine how much they have sold for to gauge what the current market is willing to pay.


What are examples of the most valuable autographs?


The value of an autograph depends on who signed it, but also on its condition and base. For these reasons, look for famous names on unique items. Examples of such valuable autographs include John F. Kennedy's signature on the front page of a 1963 Dallas Morning News edition, and a Jimmy Page autographed guitar. A Babe Ruth signed baseball is worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, while George Washington's autographed Acts of Congress is worth millions.


How should you properly store an autograph?


Take precautions based on the type of item. For example, keep signed baseball cards flat in sturdy photo binders so they do not bend, but store autographed footballs in square, see-through acrylic containers. Keep signed clothing pressed under glass in a frame, specifically a double mat frame with acid-free mat board. Always avoid storing autographs in hot spaces, such as a garage or attic, as well as cold and damp areas, such as a basement.