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Posts Tagged ‘muscle’

Nothing screams American muscle more than a huge Roots-style blower on top of a big-block engine. This Camaro has been given the full quarter-mile treatment, with all the right parts for either show cruising or high-level weekend drag races. If you want to go fast, this is your car. The seller spells out all the...

A lot of people think the muscle car era ended in 1972. And for the most part, they’re right. But if you knew where to look, you could still get a fire-breathing tire killer in 1973 – and that place was at your local Pontiac dealership. Pontiac guys will tell you that the Super Duty 455, offered starting in 1973, was...

When the Plymouth Road Runner hit the streets in 1968, Pontiac was caught off-guard. Their GTO had started the muscle car movement, but here was Mopar, taking up a large part of the market with a low-priced low-option entry that was a real performer. Pontiac needed something with a lot of flash that resonated with...

There is no doubt HEMI is king of the hill for Mopar lovers. No word inspires more awe and reverence. Aerodynamics weren’t necessarily a priority for making Chrysler’s muscle cars into racing legends. But the HEMI V8 produced enough power to get flying bricks like this Coronet down the quarter mile faster than most...

Pontiac was all about performance in the ’60s and ’70s, but speed costs money, and not every buyer had a GTO budget. Pontiac had them covered with the GT-37. “There’s a little GTO in every new GT-37, and you don’t have to be over 30 to afford it,” claimed Pontiac’s TV ad. The one-year-only GT-37 could be ordered with...

Muscle cars’ glory days started to fade in the early ’70s, but a few model lines kept up the performance in spite of oncoming emission regulations. The 1971 Buick GS 455 did an admirable job — it was a banker’s hot rod with an edge, like an upscale LS5 Chevelle SS. The Skylark-based GS line kept the two engines from...

A big block and a drop top — is there anything more you want in a full-size cruiser this summer? The seller says this ’67 Fairlane is only a few steps away from being complete. “Only minor mechanical left to finish and the majority is cosmetic.” An air cleaner top might be high on the shopping list, judging from the...

Upon walking into Sparky’s Garage, I nearly had a heart attack when my ears were assaulted by the machine gun staccato from the uncorked Rat motor parked just inside the entrance. Holy American Graffiti, Batman! I just landed in one of the most dedicated garages owned by a true hot rod enthusiast that is fortunate...

In 1982, Pontiac retooled the third generation of its classic Firebird line to provide better fuel economy in the face of rising gas prices. Where previous generations of Firebirds had been heavy, high-performance muscle cars, the 1982 models shed enough weight to significantly improve gas efficiency while marginally...

Here’s a rare one – a ’66 Cyclone GT convertible. It’s one of just 2,158 built that year. And better yet, it’s said to have matching numbers and looks basically stock apart from some aftermarket chrome rims, triple gauges under the dash, and a newer stereo. The GT package took the 1966 Cyclone from a middling...

EPA emissions mandates killed the muscle cars of the 1970s. But those smog rules didn’t say anything about trucks. That was a loophole Dodge couldn’t ignore. They jumped on the opportunity to make a muscle truck, jamming a 360-ci police-spec mill into a short-bed D150 in 1978. With that, the Li’l Red Express was...

This Biscayne is a total Q-ship – a monster tri-power 427 in a plain white wrapper. It has 400 horses that they’ll never see coming at your local drag strip. Forget muscle car characteristic stripes and hood scoops — this car is perfect for racers who want to fly under the radar until the lights go green. Then that...

This Australian Falcon XB looks like a cross between a Dodge Challenger and a Ford Ranchero from the early 1970s. Functionally, it’s a lot like an El Camino or Ranchero. But in Australia, performance-oriented Utes like this are coveted, and they’re ultra rare in this country. So if you’re looking to turn some heads while...

Luxo-barge or muscle car? Chevrolet’s first-generation Monte Carlo has a great silhouette with its long nose and short decklid. Its aim was always luxury first, but when fitted with a 402- or 454-ci big block, the Monte became a heavily-optioned muscle car. Just the thing for getting to the marina on time. This black...

This ’73 Mach 1 Mustang looks a lot like the original “Gone in 60 Seconds” Eleanor – only with black Mach 1 side graphics that the original movie car didn’t have. Unlike the CGI-created GT500 jump at the end of the 2000 movie remake, the first Eleanor actually jumped a distance of 128 feet in 1974, cresting over 30 feet...

Ask a group of car guys what the biggest baddest American muscle car of all time is and you’ll get a handful of answers. But Hemi Cudas will always be near the top of that list, and for good reason. These cars were all about overkill from the start, with their 425-hp 426 Hemi engines, dual quad carburetors, Shaker...

This well documented GTX shows just 18,838 miles, which are said to actual since new. It wears a shiny repaint in correct and appealing Forest Green but is otherwise an unrestored original, complete with factory trunk mat, jack, and spare. The standard-equipment 440/375 “Super Commando”  and TorqueFlite automatic will...

Oldsmobile’s F-85 is overshadowed the long-running Cutlass that it begat, as well as the well muscled 442. But the first-gen cars have a styling and presence that is all their own. This 1962 coupe retains its original powertain, sheet metal and interior components, which are all functional and in “excellent”...

In 1969, the Road Runner was near the top of Plymouth’s intermediate-size muscle cars, following only the GTX in horsepower and standard features. The convertible featured here is rare, as just 2,128 convertibles were built that year, and only 773 of them came with a 4-speed transmission. Muscle car survival rates...

The Vega was introduced in 1971 as a small car for the Chevrolet line, and it didn’t take long for muscle car owners to figure out how to modify them for better performance. In fact, well-known tuner Baldwin Motion out of New York built and sold “Super Vegas,” which could be ordered with 350-ci small-block or 454-ci...

First posted by Joe MacFarland on the eBay Stories blog. Used by permission. The chance of finding a 1960s original muscle car with low mileage is about as rare as spotting the original muscleman, Arnold Schwarzenegger, revisiting Muscle Beach in southern California these days.  But our eBay Top Shared page pointed...