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Posts by: Jim Pickering

If you’ve spent any time around GM muscle cars, you probably know the Yenko name, as his dealer-built cars are some of the rarest and most notorious cars of the muscle era. In a time when you couldn’t get an engine bigger than a 396 cubic inches in a Camaro, Don Yenko offered special 427-powered cars, and he worked...

Custom wagons are hot, especially when they have a generally stock appearance and sit low on painted steel rims. They’re just the thing to take the family to a car show, or haul a few buddies and a couple of surfboards out to the beach. And better yet, they’re simple to fix and rarely break. This dropped ’61 Chevy...

EPA emissions mandates killed the muscle cars of the 1970s. But those smog rules didn’t say anything about trucks. That was a loophole Dodge couldn’t ignore. They jumped on the opportunity to make a muscle truck, jamming a 360-ci police-spec mill into a short-bed D150 in 1978. With that, the Li’l Red Express was...

This Dodge looks like your typical mid-1960s 440, but it’s packing something very special under the hood – a Max Wedge 426-ci V8. That makes this pedestrian-looking Mopar good for mid-12 second quarter-mile passes, if not faster. And that’s assuming the engine is still stock. Developed for Super Stock drag racing in the...

This 1964 MGB roadster looks like a fun way to wheel into the best time of year. The chrome bumpers, steel dash, and British Racing Green body look to be in great shape. The black interior looks clean, and that steel dash looks very, very cool. This car was made for summer afternoon runs down two-lane highways. The...

This Biscayne is a total Q-ship – a monster tri-power 427 in a plain white wrapper. It has 400 horses that they’ll never see coming at your local drag strip. Forget muscle car characteristic stripes and hood scoops — this car is perfect for racers who want to fly under the radar until the lights go green. Then that...

Imagine Southern California on a sunny afternoon sometime in 1973. Movie stars, producers and directors liked sporty little convertibles.  If you could jump into a Wayback Machine and drive through one of Los Angeles’ winding canyons — maybe Malibu, Benedict or Coldwater — you would see lots of glammy Mercedes-Benz...

This Australian Falcon XB looks like a cross between a Dodge Challenger and a Ford Ranchero from the early 1970s. Functionally, it’s a lot like an El Camino or Ranchero. But in Australia, performance-oriented Utes like this are coveted, and they’re ultra rare in this country. So if you’re looking to turn some heads while...

NAPCO four-wheel-drive truck conversions from the 1950s aren’t particularly common these days, but even less common is a NAPCO 1957 Ford F-350. If you’re looking for an interesting restoration project, this could be your truck. It’s an ex-fire company truck from Mount Lodge Fire Co in New York, according to the seller....

I love this Comet mostly for its sky-high nose and relocated rear axle. It has an all-business look about it, complete with a driver’s seat that’s pushed way back over the rear axle and yellow-tinted windows, just like you would have seen on the early funny cars at Lions back in the ’60s. Although this car is a more...

It’s pretty easy to find Impalas, Bel Airs, Galaxies, and Fairlanes at car shows and cruise-ins. But Oldsmobile Starfires? Not so much. Today they seem downright rare by comparison, even though 34,839 were sold in 1962. I like this Starfire for its original feel and great condition. It has just over 100,000 original...

This ’73 Mach 1 Mustang looks a lot like the original “Gone in 60 Seconds” Eleanor – only with black Mach 1 side graphics that the original movie car didn’t have. Unlike the CGI-created GT500 jump at the end of the 2000 movie remake, the first Eleanor actually jumped a distance of 128 feet in 1974, cresting over 30 feet...

There’s a lot to love about this vintage custom Chevy. Its mild custom treatment gives it great curb appeal, and aside from the painted scallops and red wheels, it’s mostly stock underneath, including its 235-ci straight six and column-shifted manual transmission. The result is a truck that is reported to start and run...

At first glance, this little Datsun looks like a relatively common vintage Japanese truck. But the first factory-built Datsun/Nissan 4x4s sold in this country didn’t come along until the 1980s, so this is a relatively rare find. The seller doesn’t note much about the 4×4 system in this truck, other than that it features...

Ask a group of car guys what the biggest baddest American muscle car of all time is and you’ll get a handful of answers. But Hemi Cudas will always be near the top of that list, and for good reason. These cars were all about overkill from the start, with their 425-hp 426 Hemi engines, dual quad carburetors, Shaker...

Toyota’s FJ40 has a tough-as-nails reputation. Add to that a small-block Chevrolet engine, a suspension lift, a full roll cage, and 37-inch radials, and you get a full-tilt off-road powerhouse that’ll likely keep up with any other 4×4 out on the trail. The seller of this FJ40 is quick to not that it isn’t perfect...

Ford’s Model A was an extremely popular starting point for hot rodders of the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. And it was for good reason – the cars were readily available, relatively cheap, and could be modified easily thanks to a massive aftermarket parts network. They’re still a common sight at just about every cruise-in and...

Volkswagen busses are everywhere in the U.S., but you rarely see pickups built on the same platform. Why? Well, in the 1960s, in response to a steep tariff placed on U.S. chicken in France and West Germany, the U.S. placed a 25% tariff on the importation of light trucks, brandy, dextrin, and potato starch. Over the...

Chevrolet’s full-size car line was revamped completely for 1959. It got subtle but important updates in 1960, resulting in sharper lines from front to rear. The El Camino was built on the full-size platform for 1959 and 1960 only, and they’re a relatively rare sight today, due to the ways in which they were used from...

Vintage trucks have gained significant value over the past few years. Especially those with rare options and excellent condition. This ’67 short bed 4×4 matches that criteria, as the seller says it’s one of less than 30 built with a short bed, four-wheel drive, manual transmission and factory tach. And since it’s...

The 1960s were the right time for race-ready cars from the factory—and that wasn’t just true in the USA. GM’s Australian division, Holden, made the HK Monaro an instant winner with its GTS 327 package. Tony Roberts and Bob Watson piloted one to a first race win at the 1968 Sandown 3-hour endurance race. Later in 1968,...