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Posts by: Chad Tyson

Kaiser-Frazer sold the Henry J in the early ’50s as a low-budget economy car. It began as a pioneering concept for an American compact, but became lost in higher-than-expected costs, unattractive styling and a growing national appetite for big cars. Today they’re relatively rare, but that doesn’t really make them...

This 1987 Buick GNX is practically new, with just 10 miles on the odometer. It’s build number 155 of 547. The standard black paint with gray and black interior are in remarkable condition, an obvious testament to the low mileage. The engine bay is clean enough for an elite concours d’elegance. For the one-year-only...

The Amphicar wasn’t a great car and it wasn’t a great boat. But if you’re in the market for a slow speed cruiser that you can literally drive into a lake (and back out again), there’s no better choice. Amphicars were built from 1961–68 with an estimated 3,878 total units produced. The original four-cylinder 1,147-cc...

Despite 15 million examples built during a 19-year production run, an original Model T is a unique sight on roads today. For good reason — anyone with an idea on how driving should be will probably find the three pedals and lack of shift lever disconcerting. A previous owner restored — frame off — this 1922 example...

A Roger Penske-fielded, Mark Donohue- driven AMC Javelin won seven out of 10 races in the 1971 Trans-Am series, taking the overall championship. This 1971 AMC Javelin is “a dedicated recreated vintage Trans Am racer.” The seller says, “No one has ever made one of these in over 40 years to match the level of detail and...

As the go-to bedroom car poster for boys growing up in the ’80s, the easily recognizable Lamborghini Countach wedge shape and sharp angles became synonymous with fast and luxurious living. This 1985 Countach is said to be one of only 37 produced with factory fuel injection tuned by Jasjit Rarewala of Lamborghini North...

This 1964 Chevy Corvair Monza Spyder is a 77k mile survivor, sporting its original black paint and even its original 1964 Virginia plates. The seller says a repaint would get the car to show like new again, but how many 1964 survivors are left? If they weren’t scrapped, they’ve probably been restored. Highlights of...

Want a lot of fast, off-road fun? Bruce Meyers’ creation is the original fiberglass dune buggy. It spawned many imitators, with an estimated 300 companies producing 250,000 copies and near copies. And for good reason — the Meyers Manx beat Corvettes and Cobras in its class at Pike’s Peak Hill Climb and won 39 of 41...

There is no doubt HEMI is king of the hill for Mopar lovers. No word inspires more awe and reverence. Aerodynamics weren’t necessarily a priority for making Chrysler’s muscle cars into racing legends. But the HEMI V8 produced enough power to get flying bricks like this Coronet down the quarter mile faster than most...

This ’69 El Camino is a great balance of utility and tire-melting power. It has the matching-numbers 396-ci engine, but non-original (still correct) Turbo 400 and 12-bolt rear. It’s just the thing to haul that new dishwasher home before heading out to the drag races. Starting in 1969, the SS 396 was no longer a...

BMW was at the brink of bankruptcy in the late ’50s. Soaring costs of the 507 roadster and meager sales across the line prompted the Bavarian company to turn to cheaper models. BMW licensed the Isetta micro car from Iso SpA, and in time, and with several other smaller models, the German company turned the ledgers...

Pontiac was all about performance in the ’60s and ’70s, but speed costs money, and not every buyer had a GTO budget. Pontiac had them covered with the GT-37. “There’s a little GTO in every new GT-37, and you don’t have to be over 30 to afford it,” claimed Pontiac’s TV ad. The one-year-only GT-37 could be ordered with...

Buick’s 1965 Riviera was the last of the original first-gen cars, and also the most attractive. One-year-only clamshell headlamps cleaned up the front end, and bumper-integrated taillamps did the same for the rear. Personal luxury was given a major power boost with the first-year Gran Sport option. It added the dual...

Eye-catching Italian designs with tire-smoking American power fill a popular, if small, niche in the collector car market. In the late ’60s and early ’70s, coachbuilders stuffed Detroit iron between hand-formed steel bodies from Torino (Intermeccanica) to Bresso (Iso) to Modena (DeTomaso). The Italia was born from the...

Porsche’s 930 is known for explosive power and demanding handling characteristics. The cars were prone to oversteer with their rear-engine layout and short, 89-inch wheelbase. A simple judgment error (like lifting off of the throttle) during high-speed cornering spun many drivers off the road and into the trees. And...

What better way to get pumped for Fourth of July grilling and fireworks today than getting your very own American military vehicle? Multiple Gun Motor Carriage M16 halftracks were the premier anti-aircraft artillery in World War II. The military modified M3s to carry the Maxon M45 quadruple mount for .50 caliber M2HB...

This 1934 pickup is an amalgamation of parts. The cab is a ’34 Ford and the cut and sectioned bed is from a ’52 Chevy with a ’50s Ford tailgate. A ’48 Jaguar Mk IV grille is probably the most exotic piece of the puzzle, but it fits like it was made for the truck. Several patch panels were left simply tacked in place...

Muscle cars’ glory days started to fade in the early ’70s, but a few model lines kept up the performance in spite of oncoming emission regulations. The 1971 Buick GS 455 did an admirable job — it was a banker’s hot rod with an edge, like an upscale LS5 Chevelle SS. The Skylark-based GS line kept the two engines from...

This 1967 E-type is sleek, sexy and triple black. And while black over black may not seem like best color combination for upcoming hot summer days, there’s an easy fix for that — find a two-lane blacktop and bang through the gears up to speed. Things will cool down in a hurry. The seller did what any prospective...

Nash Bridges: “Not the ’Cuda! The ’Cuda’s gone?” Joe Dominguez: “No, the ’Cuda’s fine.” The ’Cuda is fine indeed. This is Nash Bridges #1, the first of four ’Cudas used in the CBS television show. All of the production cars were 1970 models made to look like ’71 cars, each with the proper front end, taillights, and...

This 1960 Lotus Elite has a known pampered history and is ready for summertime. It sports a stress-fracture free fiberglass monocoque, original paint and interior, original numbers-matching engine, and BMC 4-speed transmission. “Whether winding through the canyons, bombing down the highway or even just tooling through...