eBay
  • Daily Deals
  • Sell
  • Customer Support

Bidding has ended on this item. The seller has relisted this item or one like this.

 
Ships to:
Worldwide
Delivery:
 
Ships to:
Worldwide

Details about  BMW GS 800 semi-works Paris Dakar 1984 & Schek - Paris Dakar Rally 1984 - photo

See original listing
BMW GS 800 semi-works Paris Dakar 1984 & Schek - Paris Dakar Rally 1984 - photo
BMW-GS-800-semi-works-Paris-Dakar-1984-Schek-Paris-Dakar-Rally-1984-photo
Item Ended
Item condition:
--not specified
Ended:
Jul 31, 2013 03:14:19 PDT
Starting bid:
US $18.75
0 bids ]
Shipping:
$5.00 Expedited Shipping | See details
See details about international shipping here.  help icon for Shipping - opens a layer
Item location:
Utr., Netherlands

Description

eBay item number:
370860910327
Seller assumes all responsibility for this listing.

A Herl's Classic Photo Archives

100%

A superb and rare image, made from what we believe is the original negative, of the magnificent Herbert Schek , photographed with his semi-works Antar BMW GS800 in action during the Paris - Dakar Rally of 1984.

 

Herbert Schek finished the grueling heavy rally in 21ST position in a time of 72 hours, 48 minutes and 30 seconds! The official BMW team would claim the victory on quite similar machines, with Gaston Rahier claiming first place.

 

The famous BMW R 80 G/S and R 100 G/S were derived from the BMW Paris Dakar terrain racing machines and they live on with the current BMW R 1100 G/S and R 1200 G/S range.

 

The Dakar Rally (or simply "The Dakar"; formerly known as "The Paris-Dakar" or "Paris to Dakar Rally") is an annual rally raid type of off-road automobile race, organised by the Amaury Sport Organisation. Most events since the inception in 1978 were from Paris in France to Dakar in Senegal, but due to political instability in Africa, the 2009 Dakar Rally was run in South America, the first time the race took place outside of Europe and Africa. It will return to South America in 2010. The race is open to amateur and professional entries. Amateurs typically make up about eighty percent of the participants. Despite its name it is an off-road endurance race, called a rally-raid rather than a conventional rally - the terrain the competitors traverse is much tougher and the vehicles used are true off-road vehicles rather than the modified sedans used in rallies. Most of the competitive special sections are off-road, crossing dunes, mud, camel grass, rocks and erg among others. The distances of each stage covered vary from short distances up to 800-900 kilometres (500-560 mi) per day.

 

The BMW R80G/S was made between 1980 to 1987. Production totaled 21,864 bikes. It was the first in the BMW GS family of specialized dual-sport bikes, of which over 500,000 have been produced. The designation G/S is an acronym of the German words Gelände/Strasse, which mean offroad/road – highlighting the bike's dual sport design. The R80G/S was fitted with a 797.5 cc (48.67 cu in) BMW type 247 engine, which is a flat-twin (boxer) sometimes known as an airhead. The engine, which was fitted into an R65 frame, was a modified version of that fitted to the R80/7, featuring Nikasil cylinders, electronic ignition and a lighter flywheel. At the rear the bike had a new design combined single-sided swingarm and drive shaft – called a monolever due to the rear suspension being provided by single shock absorber. The monolever was stiffer and lighter than the design fitted to previous models, and was subsequently fitted to other BMW motorcycles. It differs from other BMW road bikes of the same era due to its lighter weight, longer suspension travel, and large 21 inch front wheel. The bike's popularity with adventure-seeking travellers means that it was often improved with aftermarket motorcycle accessories, such as larger fuel tanks and panniers. The R80G/S was developed for BMW by engineer Rüdiger Gutsche, a successful competitor in the International Six Days Trial on his specially adapted R75/5. In 1981, Hubert Auriol, riding a R80G/S prepared by German company HPN Motorradtechnik, won the Paris-Dakar Rally. He repeated his success on a 870 cc version of the R80G/S in 1983. Gaston Rahier won the Dakar on a 1000cc R80G/S in 1984 and then again in 1985. To commemorate their success, BMW launched the R80G/S Paris-Dakar special edition which featured a 7 imperial gallons (32 l; 8.4 US gal) fuel tank, fitted with dual petcocks and signed by Gaston Rahier. In 1986, the R80G/S was joined by the R100GS, which had a larger capacity 980 cc engine and an updated suspension and drive unit called a Paralever. In 1987, production of the R80G/S ended and was succeeded by the 650 cc R65GS, which used the same monolever suspension and drive, and the R80GS, which retained the G/S engine but used the newer Paralever drive.

 

BMW's motorcycle history began in 1921 when the company commenced manufacturing engines for other companies. Motorcycle manufacturing now operates under the BMW Motorrad brand. BMW (Bayerische Motoren Werke AG) introduced the first motorcycle under its name, the R32, in 1923. In 1921, BMW began its long association with a 1886 German invention known to Germans as the boxermotor. The first BMW motorcycle engine was designed by Max Friz, BMW's famous chief designer, in four weeks, it is very similar to the British Douglas design. This fore-and-aft 1921–1922 M2B15 boxer was manufactured by BMW for use initially by other motorcycle manufacturers, notably Victoria of Nuremberg. It proved moderately successful and BMW used it in its own Helios motorcycle. Fritz was also working on car engines and BMW developed and manufactured a small 2-stroke motorcycle called the Flink for a short time. In 1923, BMW's first "across the frame" version of the boxer engine was designed by Friz. The R32 had a 486 cc engine with 8.5 hp (6.3 kW) and a top speed of 95–100 km/h (60 mph). The engine and gearbox formed a bolt-up single unit. At a time when many motorcycle manufacturers used total-loss oiling systems, the new BMW engine featured a recirculating wet sump oiling system with a drip feed to roller bearings. This system was used by BMW until 1969, when they adopted the "high-pressure oil" system based on shell bearings and tight clearances, still in use today. The R32 became the foundation for all future boxer-powered BMW motorcycles. BMW oriented the boxer engine with the cylinder heads projecting out on each side for cooling as did the earlier British ABC. Other motorcycle manufacturers aligned the cylinders with the frame, one cylinder facing towards the front wheel and the other towards the back wheel. For example, Harley Davidson introduced the Model W, a flat twin oriented fore and aft design, in 1919 and built them until 1923. The R32 also incorporated shaft drive. BMW continued to use shaft drive in all of its motorcycles until the introduction of the F650 in 1994 and the F800 series in 2006, which featured either chain drive or a belt drive system. In 1937, Ernst Henne rode a supercharged 500 cc overhead camshaft BMW 173.88 mph (279.83 km/h), setting a world record that stood for 14 years. Henne died at the age of 101 in 2005. During World War II the Wehrmacht needed as many vehicles as it could get of all types and many other German companies were asked to build motorcycles. The BMW R75, a copy of a Zündapp KS750, performed particularly well in the harsh operating environment of the North African campaign. Motorcycles of every style had performed acceptably well in Europe, but in the desert the protruding cylinders of the flat-twin engine performed better than configurations which overheated in the sun, and shaft drives performed better than chain-drives which were damaged by desert grit. So successful were the BMWs as war-machines that the U.S. Army asked Harley-Davidson, Indian and Delco to produce a motorcycle similar to the side-valve BMW R71. Harley copied the BMW engine and transmission — simply converting metric measurements to inches — and produced the shaft-drive 750 cc 1942 Harley-Davidson XA. The end of World War II found BMW in ruins. Its plant outside of Munich was destroyed by Allied bombing. The Eisenach facility was not. It was dismantled by the Soviets as reparations and sent back to the Soviet Union where it was reassembled in Irbit to make IMZ-Ural motorcycles as is commonly alleged. The IMZ plant was supplied to the Soviets by BMW under license prior to the commencement of the Great Patriotic War. After the war the terms of Germany's surrender forbade BMW from manufacturing motorcycles. Most of BMW's brightest engineers were taken to the US and the Soviet Union to continue their work on jet engines which BMW produced during the war. When the ban on the production of motorcycles was lifted in Allied controlled Western Germany, BMW had to start from scratch. There were no plans, blueprints, or schematic drawings because they were all in Eisenach. Company engineers had to use surviving pre-war motorcycles to copy the bikes. The first post-war BMW motorcycle in Western Germany, a 250 cc R24, was produced in 1948. The R24 was based on the pre-war R23, and was the only postwar West German BMW with no rear suspension. In 1949, BMW produced 9,200 units and by 1950 production surpassed 17,000 units. BMW boxer twins manufactured from 1950 to 1956 included the 500 cc models R51/2 and 24 hp (18 kW) R51/3,[4] the 600 cc models 26 hp (19 kW) R67, 28 hp (21 kW) R67/2, and R67/3, and the sporting 35 hp (26 kW) 600 cc model R68. All these models came with plunger rear suspensions, telescopic front forks, and chromed, exposed drive shafts. Except for the R68, all these twins came with "bell-bottom" front fenders and front stands. The situation was very different in Soviet-controlled Eastern Germany where BMW's sole motorcycle plant in Eisenach was producing R35 and a handful of R75 motorcycles for reparations. This resulted in one BMW motorcycle plant existing in Eisenach between 1945 and 1948 and two motorcycle companies existing between 1948 and 1952. One was a BMW in Munich in Western Germany (later the German Federal Republic) and the other in Soviet controlled Eisenach, Eastern Germany (later the German Democratic Republic), both using the BMW name. Eventually in 1952. after the Soviets ceded control of the plant to the East German Government, and following a trademark lawsuit, this plant was renamed EMW (Eisenacher Motoren Werke). Instead of BMW's blue-and-white roundel, EMW used a very similar red-and-white roundel as its logo. No motorcycles made in East Germany after World War II were manufactured under the authority of BMW in Munich as there was no need for an occupying power to gain such authority. As the 1950s progressed, motorcycle sales plummeted. In 1957, three of BMW's major German competitors went out of business. In 1954, BMW produced 30,000 motorcycles. By 1957, that number was less than 5,500. However, by the late 1950s, BMW exported 85% of its boxer twin powered motorcycles to the United States. At that time, Butler & Smith, Inc. was the exclusive U.S. importer of BMW. In 1955, BMW began introducing a new range of motorcycles with Earles forks and enclosed drive shafts. These were the 26 hp (19 kW) 500 cc R50, the 30 hp (22 kW) 600 cc R60, and the 35 hp (26 kW) sporting 600 cc R69. On June 8, 1959, John Penton rode a BMW R 69 from New York to Los Angeles in 53 hours and 11 minutes, slashing over 24 hours from the previous record of 77 hours and 53 minutes set by Earl Robinson on a 45 cubic inch (740 cc) Harley-Davidson. Although U.S. sales of BMW motorcycles were strong, BMW was in financial trouble. Through the combination of selling off its aircraft engine division and obtaining financing with the help of Herbert Quandt, BMW was able to survive. The turnaround was thanks in part to the increasing success of BMW's automotive division. Since the beginnings of its motorcycle manufacturing, BMW periodically introduced single-cylinder models. In 1967, BMW offered the last of these, the R 27. Most of BMW's offerings were still designed to be used with sidecars. By this time sidecars were no longer a consideration of most riders; people were interested in sportier motorcycles. The 26 hp (19 kW) R50/2, 30 hp (22 kW) R60/2, and 42 hp (31 kW) R69S marked the end of sidecar-capable BMWs. Of this era, the R69S remains the most desirable example of the dubbed "/2" ("slash-two") series because of significantly greater engine power than other models, among other features unique to this design. For the 1968 and 1969 model years only, BMW exported into the United States three "US" models. These were the R50US, the R60US, and the R69US. On these motorcycles, there were no sidecar lugs attached to the frame and the front forks were telescopic forks, which were later used worldwide on the slash-5 series of 1970 through 1973. Earles-fork models were sold simultaneously in the United States as buyers had their choice of front suspensions. In 1970, BMW introduced an entirely revamped product line of 500 cc, 600 cc and 750 cc displacement models, the R50/5, R60/5 and R75/5 respectively and came with the "US" telescopic forks noted above. The engines were a complete redesign from the older models, producing more power and including electric starting (although the kick-starting feature was still included). Part way through the 1973 model year, a long wheel base (LWB) was added to correct some earlier handling problems. These models are popularly called 1973½ models. Most models were came with large 6-gallon tanks, but some came with 4½-gallon tanks. These are called "toaster" models because of the tank's resemblance to a kitchen toaster. The "/5" models were short-lived, however, being replaced by another new product line in 1974. In that year the 500 cc model was deleted from the lineup and an even bigger 900 cc model was introduced, along with improvements to the electrical system and frame geometry. These models were the R60/6, R75/6 and the R90/6. In 1973, the kick starter was finally eliminated and a supersport model, the BMW R90S, was introduced. In addition to "/" or "slash" models, other Airhead models such as the G/S (later, GS) and ST also have dedicated followings within BMW circles, while others favor certain earlier models like /5 "toasters." Each has its merits which owners will freely debate with enthusiasm. Later BMW model types such as K-bikes (1983 on) and oilheads (1993 on) included technical innovations that made them more complicated though many owners still elect to service them personally. In 1977, the product line moved on to the "/7" models. The R80/7 was added to the line. The R90 (898 cc) models, "/6" and R90S models had their displacement increased to 1,000 cc; replaced by the R100/7 and the R100S, respectively. These were the first liter size (1,000 cc) machines produced by BMW. 1977 was a banner year with the introduction of the first BMW production motorcycle featuring a full fairing, the R100RS. This sleek model, designed through wind-tunnel testing, produced 70 hp (51 kW) and had a top speed of 200 km/h (124 mph). In 1978, the R100RT was introduced into the lineup for the 1979 model year, as the first "full-dress" tourer, designed to compete in this market with the forthcoming Honda Goldwing. In 1979, the R60 was replaced with the 650 cc R65, an entry-level motorcycle with 48 hp (36 kW) that had its very own frame design. Due to its smaller size and better geometrics, front and rear 18-inch (460 mm) wheels and a very light flywheel, was an incredibly well-handling bike that could easily keep up and even run away from its larger brothers when in proper hands on sinuous roads. BMW added a variant in 1982: the R65LS, a "sportier" model with a one-fourth fairing, double front disc brakes, stiffer suspension and different carburettors that added 5 hp (4 kW). A short stroke version of the R65, the 450 cc R 45 appeared in some markets. In early 1983, BMW introduced a 1000 cc, in-line four-cylinder, water-cooled engine to the European market, the K100. The K series comes with a simplified and distinctive rear suspension, a single-sided swingarm. (In 1985 the traditionally powered boxer R80RT touring bike received this monolever rear suspension system and in 1987 the R100RT got it). In 1985, BMW came a 750 cc three-cylinder version, this one smoothed with another first, a counterbalance shaft. In 1986, BMW introduced the world's first electrically adjustable windshield on the K100LT. In 1988, BMW introduced ABS on its motorcycles — a first in the motorcycle industry. ABS became standard on all BMW K models. In 1993 ABS was first introduced on BMW's boxer line on the R1100RS. It has since become available as an option on the rest of BMW's motorcycle range. In 1989, BMW introduced its version of a full-fairing sport bike, the K1. It was based upon the K100 engine, but now with four valves per cylinder. Output was near 100 hp (75 kW). In 1995, BMW ceased production of airhead 2-valve engines and moved its boxer engined line completely over to the 4-valve oilhead system first introduced in 1993. During this period, BMW introduced a number of motorcycles including: the R Series airheads - R65GS, R80GS, R100GS, the R Series oilheads - R850R/GS/C, R1100R/RS/RT/GS/S, R1150R/RS/RT/GS/S, R1200C, the F Series - F650 Funduro, F650ST Strada, F650GS, F650GS Dakar, F650CS Scarver, and the K Series - K1, K100, K100RS, K100RT, K75, K75C, K75S, K75RT, K1100RS, K1100LT, K1200RS, K1200LT, K1200GT. The BMW R1200C, produced from 1997 to 2004, was BMW Motorcycles only entry into the Cruiser market.

 

We have more photos listed on Ebay of BMW and other brands with various riders. You can always contact us if you have any requests.

 

This is your rare chance to own an image that reflects a very interesting piece of BMW’s glorious history. Therefore it is printed in a nice large format of ca. 8" x 12" (ca. 20 x 30 cm).

 

The image is copyright protected.

 

NOTE: The picture is professionally printed, the image on this auction does not do just to the original! Please keep in mind though that this negative was made in the 1980s and it was taken with a camera from that era as well.  

 

You can always contact us for more motorcycle / automotive photos! Check out our other Ebay auctions for more motorcycle and car (racing) photos! Combine auctions and save on shipping.

 

contact us for more BMW and other motorcycle photos!

Take advantage of our shipping discount, up to 5 photos for only $5.00 shipping Priority Air Mail and for 5 or more photos, shipping is FREE, also Priority Air Mail!


Ask any questions before the auctions ends, please.

 

Bidders from the Netherlands, please contact us first before placing a bid.

Questions and answers about this item

No questions or answers have been posted about this item.




00000

Place bid

Time left:
Current bid:
(Approximately ##1##)
Shipping:
Import charges:
Your max bid:
Your max bid:
By clicking Confirm bid, you commit to buy this item from the seller if you are the winning bidder.
By clicking Confirm bid, you are committing to buy this item from the seller if you are the winning bidder and have read and agree to the Global Shipping Program terms and conditions - opens in a new window or tab. Import charges previously quoted are subject to change if you increase you maximum bid amount.
Cancel
Loading...
Resume bidding, if the page does not update immediately.
Place bid
Review and confirm your bid
Bid confirmation
d
h
m
s
day
hour
hours
FREE shipping
See item description
(Approximately ##1##)
(Enter ##1## or more)
(Enter more than ##1##)
Your max bid:
Increase max bid
Place bid
Confirm bid
Increase max bid
Cancel
Change bid
Close
, you've been outbid. Don't let it get away - bid again!
, you're the highest bidder on this item. Hope you win it!
, you're the first bidder. Hope you win!
, you're currently the high bidder, but you're close to getting outbid.
, this auction is almost over and you're currently the high bidder.
, you're the high bidder, but the reserve price hasn't been met.
Please enter your bid again.
Please enter a valid number as the bid price.
Enter an amount that is equal or greater than the minimum bid required. This can be found under the bid entry box.
Maximum bids can't be lowered once they're submitted.
This seller requires the buyer to have a PayPal account to purchase this item. Get a PayPal account here .
Your bid is greater than or equal to the Buy It Now price. We recommend you purchase this item via Buy It Now. If you still wish to bid, you may do so below.
Time left:
Current bid:
(approximately ##1##)
Your maximum bid:
(approximately ##1##)
Increase your maximum bid:
By clicking 1 Click Bid, you commit to buy this item from the seller if you're the winning bidder. Learn moreabout 1-click bid - opens in a new window or tab
day
hour
min
sec
days
hours
mins
secs
(approximately ##1##)
Winning bid:
Starting bid:
Close
Congrats! The auction has ended and you're the winner.
The auction has ended, but the reserve price was not met.
Sorry, the auction has ended and you were outbid.
Good news, you're the high bidder.
Sorry, you've been outbid.
You're the high bidder, but the reserve price is not met.
Please enter a higher amount than the current bid.
Maximum bids cannot be lowered once submitted.
Please enter a valid number.