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Details about  QUANAH PARKER 8x10" HAND COLOR TINTED PHOTO NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN COMANCHE 1909

QUANAH PARKER 8x10" HAND COLOR TINTED PHOTO NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN COMANCHE 1909 See original listing
QUANAH-PARKER-8x10-HAND-COLOR-TINTED-PHOTO-NATIVE-AMERICAN-INDIAN-COMANCHE-1909
Item Sold
Item condition:
--not specified
Ended:
Jul 31, 2012 12:29:42 PDT
Price:
US $14.50
[
History:
]
Shipping:
FREE Standard Shipping | See details
Item location:
Oxnard, California, United States

Description

eBay item number:
150848517300
Seller assumes all responsibility for this listing.

Item specifics

Original/Reprint:

Reprint

Subject:

Western

Listed By:

Dealer or Reseller

Color:

Color

Signed?:

Unsigned

Framing:

Unframed

Date of Creation:

Pre-1950

Region of Origin:

US

Photo Type:

Negative

Size Type/ Largest Dimension:

Medium (Up to 10'')

Up for auction is an awesome 8 x 10" full color photo print of a hand oil tinted photograph featuring Native American Quanah Parker, the last chief of the Quahadi Comanche Indians during the late 1800s & early 1900s.
 

This is a high-resolution (320dpi/ 2,560 x 3,200 pixel) 8" x 10" vintage image, hand oil tinted and photo processed onto Fuji Film Archival Photo Paper.
Fuji Film Archival Photo Paper is the highest quality paper and photo processing available. Fuji guarantees it not to fade for up to 70 years!

 

Quanah Parker (c. late 1852 - February 23, 1911) was a Native American Indian leader, the son of Comanche chief Peta Nocona and European American woman Cynthia Ann Parker, and the last chief of the Quahadi Comanche Indians, 1909.


Quanah Parker's mother, Cynthia Ann Parker {b.ca 1827}, was a member of the large Parker frontier family that settled in east Texas in the 1830s. She was captured in 1836 by Comanches during the raid of Fort Parker near present-day Groesbeck, Texas. She was given the Indian name Nadua ("Someone Found"), and adopted into the Nocona band of Comanches. Cynthia Ann eventually married the Comanche warrior Noconie, (aka Tah-con-ne-ah-pe-ah) (called Peta Nocona by the whites), who was a Mexican captive. Quanah was her firstborn son. She also had another son, Pecos ("Peanut") and a daughter, Topsana ("Prairie Flower)" In 1860, Cynthia Ann Parker was recaptured in the battle of Pease River by Texas Rangers under Lawrence Sullivan Ross. Peta Nocona, Quanah, and most of the other men were out hunting when Ross' men attacked. Returning to find the aftermath, they found it difficult to get any information as only a few people were still alive. Meanwhile, Cynthia Ann was reunited with her white family, but years with the Comanches had made her a different person. She frequently demanded to return to her husband, but was never permitted to do so. After Topsana died of an illness in 1863, Cynthia Ann starved herself to death in 1870.

Soon after the Pease River battle, Peta Nocona was said to be a broken, bitter man. He was later wounded on a raid with Apaches. Already in ill-health, with an older war wound troubling him, he soon died. Before his death, he told Quanah of his mother's capture from the whites. With this revelation came taunts from other tribesmen that Quanah was a half-breed. With Nocona's death, his band split. Quanah joined the Destanyuka band, where Chief Wild Horse took him under his wing. Though he grew to considerable standing as a warrior, he never felt comfortable with the Destanyuka. He left and formed the Quahadi ("Antelope Eaters") band with warriors from another tribe. The Quahadis eventually grew in number, becoming the largest of the Comanche bands, and also the most notorious. Quanah Parker became a leader of the Quahadi, and led them successfully for a number of years.

In October, 1867, Quanah was among the Comanche chiefs at Medicine Lodge. Though he did not give a speech – his place was as an observer – he did make a statement about not signing the Medicine Lodge Treaty. His band remained free while other Comanches signed.

In the early 1870s, the plains Indians were losing the battle for their land. Following the capture of the Kiowa chiefs Satank, Adoeet (Big Tree), and Satanta, the Kiowa, Comanche, and Cheyenne tribes joined forces in several battles. Colonel Ranald Mackenzie was sent to eradicate all remaining Indians who had not settled on reservations.

In 1874, while in the Texas panhandle, a Comanche prophet named Isatai summoned the tribes to Adobe Walls, where several buffalo hunters were active. With Kiowa Chief Big Bow, Quanah was in charge of one group of warriors. The incident was his closest brush with death; he was shot twice.

With their food source depleted, and under constant pressure from the army, the Quahadi Comanches finally surrendered and in 1875 moved to a reservation in southwestern Oklahoma. His home in Cache, Oklahoma was called the Star House. Parker's was the last tribe of the Staked Plains or Llano Estacado to come to the reservation. Quanah was named chief over all the Comanches on the reservation, and proved to be a forceful, resourceful and able leader. Through wise investments, he became perhaps the wealthiest American Indian of his day in the United States. Quanah embraced much of white culture, and was well respected by the whites. He went on hunting trips with President Theodore Roosevelt. Nevertheless, he rejected both monogamy and traditional Protestant Christianity in favor of the Native American Church Movement. He had five wives and twenty five children and founded the Native American Church. One of his sons, White Parker, later became a Methodist minister.

Author Bill Neeley writes:
"Not only did Quanah pass within the span of a single lifetime from a Stone Age warrior to a statesman in the age of the Industrial Revolution,but he never lost a battle to the white man and he also accepted the challenge and responsibility of leading the whole Comanche tribe on the difficult road toward their new existence."

Quanah died on February 23, 1911. He is buried at the Fort Sill Cemetery, beside his mother and sister. The inscription on his tombstone reads:
Resting Here Until Day Breaks
And Shadows Fall and Darkness
Disappears is
Quanah Parker Last Chief of the Comanches
Born 1852
Died Feb. 23, 1911.

Photograph taken in 1909 & hand oil tinted by artist Margaret A. Rogers

 

You can't get this colorized version of this photo anywhere else!

I have the exclusive rights to the sales of this image.

Photographs are also available in larger sizes from 8x12" to 11x14", 12x18", 16x20" & 20x30" sizes.
Email me for a price quote.
I'd be happy to create an auction just for you

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Good luck with your bidding.
 

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