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Nikon 1 D800
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Nikon D800 36.3 MP Digital SLR Camera - Black (Body Only)

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2 High Capacity EN-EL15 ENEL15 Batteries for Nikon D800 DSLR Camera
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Brooklyn, NY, USA
2 High Capacity EN-EL15 ENEL15 Batteries for Nikon D800 DSLR Camera
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Nikon D800 36.3MP Digital SLR Camera Body USA WARRANTY FREE SHIPPING ROBERTS!
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Indianapolis, IN, USA
Nikon D800 36.3MP Digital SLR Camera Body USA WARRANTY FREE SHIPPING ROBERTS!
$2,399.99Price
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Nikon D800 Body *OPEN BOX/DEMO*
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Kenmore, WA, USA
Nikon D800 Body *OPEN BOX/DEMO*
$2,699.00Price
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Nikon D800 36mp Full Frame DSLR - less than 27,000 shutter count - Great Deal!
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Baltimore, MD, USA
Nikon D800 36mp Full Frame DSLR - less than 27,000 shutter count - Great Deal!
$1,769.95Price
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Product description
Product Information
The black Nikon D800 is a camera body only. This digital SLR camera is dust proof and features a high 36.3 MP resolution that produces 1080p HD cinematic photos. Some of the key features on this Nikon camera body include an input for headphones, an input for a microphone, a DX crop mode, and an OLPF filter. The OLPF, or optical low-pass filter, is located in front of the sensor. Furthermore, the Nikon camera body offers a 3.2-inch LCD display screen to view photos taken with the option to remove them if desired. This 36.3 MP camera also includes a peak audio meter display. In addition, users can record short HD-quality movie footage from the Nikon D800. For convenience, this Nikon camera body can be connected to an HDTV via HDMI cable. This feature gives users the option to share high-definition still images and HD movie-quality video right on the screen of an HDTV. Overall, this Nikon camera body is simple to use and includes enhanced features to increase the resolution of the images and videos taken.

Product Highlights
Video

Product Identifiers
BrandNikon
ModelD800
MPN25480
UPC018208254804, 018208922055

Key Features
Camera TypeDigital SLR
Sensor Resolution36.3 MP
Screen Size3.2"

Optical Sensor
Sensor TypeCMOS

Lens System
Lens For SDBody Only
Focus AdjustmentAutofocus & Manual Focus

Exposure
Light Sensitivity Max1006400

Memory / Storage
Supported Flash MemoryCompactFlash, CompactFlash Card Type I, Eye-Fi card, SD Card, SD Memory Card, SDHC Card, SDHC Memory Card, SDXC Card, SDXC Memory Card

Dimensions
Weight31.7 Oz.

Display
Display TypeLCD
Display Size3.2"

Resolution
Max Video Resolution1920 x 1080

Other Features
Additional FeaturesDust proof, HDMI, Interchangeable Lenses, USB 3.0

eBay Product ID: EPID112575577

Reviews & Research

Customer Reviews

Average review score based on 27 user reviews

100%

of customers recommend this product

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Feature ratings

  • Picture quality
  • Features
  • Size / weight
  • Value for money
Created: 09/30/12

D800: Can You Handle It? Find or make a way to afford this camera

Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.

Okay, I know, another 5 Stars across the Board Review. First and foremost I am a photographer and then a Nikon acquisition addict or NAA. The D800E was a no-brainer. It was a made for me camera. Martha my dear, you are going to need to buy some new things.

This is a major step up the Nikon Food Chain if you are just coming into FX. If you are already shooting Full Frame it's still a step up and you may still need/want to upgrade some things.

First the transfer cable is a USB UEC-14 cable. You will probably need a spare or two. Secondly, you will need a Extreme Pro CF card and a Extreme Pro SD card. (I recommend Sandisk 32 G/B each card.) There is a great Eye Fi card that will upload the images straight to your laptop or Desktop with appropiate app installed. Also, you will need some spare batteries: EN-EL15 And then make sure you have enough hard drive space dedicated for images.
Again, I recommend between 1 to 2 terabyte external drive or an Ultra Book Laptop with 500 M/B for images.

Are you going to buy this camera? The most likely answer is yes. The only variable is the MTA, er Mean Time to Acquisition. (not poor ole Charley on the Mass. Transit Authority). The in camera High Dynamic Range customizable capability is astounding on initial contact. It's video potential is "professional" level quality.

If you are coming to D800 from FX, an adventure in serendipity awaits you. Those upgrading from the underworld of DX, expect and appreciate the learning curve. Depending on your passion and shooting schedule, give yourself 3 to 8 months. You get alot for your money.

Don't give a poohbah for all the Nikon fancy schmancy hoopla about the D800? Go get a D600. It's cheaper and it's FX so how bad is that? But, ask yourself, Martha, can I handle the Big Bad, He-Man Nikon D800?

Nothing, bar none, in the FX world eclipses D800. A few wannabees come close for more or less money but no cigar. In closing, I only have two words for the D800: Absolutely Stunning!

Do not worry about cost. Just put together your acquisition plan and then boogey on down and getcha one when you save up or earn up the do, ray, me.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful. Was this review helpful? Yes | No

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Created: 12/27/12

Excellent camera for studio work, but requiring more careful manual control

Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.

As a film photographer for 30 years, I had been waiting for a Nikon digital studio camera that could replace my 6x6 square format film gear that I typically use with my studio strobes. In the past, I had been using the 12MP Nikon D300 for studio work and reached its limits of resolution where it reaches an acceptable level of detail only at ISO 100. Also, the 36MP EXPEED3 FX sensor would allow me much improved low light performance lacking in my D300 above ISO 1600. I also wanted to occasionally use my Nikkor lenses for natural light video capture without having to purchase a dedicated video camera and lenses. Lastly, I have been looking for a FX camera so that my AF-D and manual AIS prime lenses can be used at their natural focal lengths, rather than cropped to 1.5x. Most other features of the camera are nice-to-haves, duplicating or improving upon the features of the D300, but not critical for what I plan to use the D800 for. Since I shoot manual and incident meter my strobes, I have not tested the AE features nor the metering modes. I also have not tested the video functions except to see that they work easily enough in Live View mode.

Generally, the D800 feels very similar to the D300 menu systems and grip. I have always thought that the complexity of the menu system is unnecessary, except to confuse neophytes and the D800 is no better than the D700 or D300 in that sense. The video features seem to be nicely integrated and Live View modes simplified, compared with the D300, which I have long given up trying to use. Like a medium format film body, the extremely high resolution combined with shallow depth of field makes for amazing clarity in the large RAW files but also requires careful focus control, and requires some taming of the automated features to help slow it down. For example in single-shot mode necessary for strobe work, I find that the shutter trips a second or third image very easily. I also find that the spot focus mode only allows me to use the sweet spot of the viewfinder and lenses for focus determination and requires that I check focus and reposition frequently. In this case, the D300's 51 AF points are better laid out across the entire viewfinder than the D800, where they are all clustered in the center of the frame.

When reviewing some test images in Adobe Lightroom, I was able to zoom into 3:1 before I started to see digitization of the image details without sharpening and noise, making it more than adequate for studio work. However, it is clear that at this magnification that chromatic aberration and flare are more obvious, for example, when trees are backlit by sky.

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Created: 12/08/12

Will I, or not, have a lasting relationship with a schizophrenic blond?

Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.

Nikon has been my camera of choice, aside from the Hasselblad, since 1958. I came into digital late with a D200 for a specific initiative and found shooting requirements exceeded the ISO of the D200 and so lurched into the world of the D800. Yes, Photoshop, the other part of this hideous equation of complexity and opaqueness and F-90 learning curves, hovers in the background on my wheezing computer.

The metaphor for a D800 is schizophrenic and when lucid, bi-polar. It has moments when it is lucid, the majority of the time it is quite mad, all a product of scores of "controls" one never masters, one only fights as a salmon going upstream against an 100 mph wind with the firm idiotic conviction that genes will prevail, and perservence in the effort will be rewarded, and the government won't get any more commie-like than it is already.

I had a Jaguar sedan in my late teens that resembled a Rolls Royce. It was absolutely beautiful, a damn work of art. It got fantastic gas milage (about which I didn't care at the time with gas being 19.09 a gallon) because it wouldn't run but 25% of the time.

The D800 is one thing. The Nikkor lens are quite another and I have a broad selection of glass all of which are stunning. Now, married with these 1.2, or whatever masterpieces, you hit it just right and WHAM! You get breathtaking shots. But these shots are the product of laboring with ISO (forget it, ISO 200 and ISO 800 digital means nothing to film ISO/ASA), Metering, Exposure Modes, Shooting Banks (Oh god! Shooting
Banks! Get somebody to explain Shooting Banks to you because the hardcopy available certainly doesn't have a goddamn clue), 11 different available Settings all the way from Image Quality to Auto Distortion Control).

You begin to get the picture, pun intended. Available Modes, A, S, M and P (Aperture, Shutter, Manual and so-called automatic) priority settings are not constant and the checked histogram showing on target (bell shaped curve or close to it) is really about 1/2 stop or worse over exposed. And this really becomes an issue when shooting in a dynamic venue like a football game. I shoot Manual -1 stop to get a rich, full exposure.

I have friends who are astrophotographers. They have tons of equipment and miles of wires hanging off their scopes and computers. Beyond complex. But what is being sold as complexity if really versatility.

If you enjoy tons of equipment and miles of wires hanging off your equipment, and you have an Expodisc, oh you must have an Expodisc, and certainly a variable density filter and the best circular polarizer you can buy, You will adore holding the D800, it's just like sitting in a dead Jag.

Buy hey, when the Jag was running, and the dash was glowing with purple lights, and the moon roof was rolled open, and the red Connoly hides giving off that sweet smell along with that 17-year-old blond sitting close to the right, there was nothing better.

When you get home from a football game and there are 60 shots our of 350 that are art, well, there's nothing better, but scary when you look at that string of bleached out crap you just knew was fine when you glanced at the damn histogram.

So, if you ain't a-skeered of not being able to trust that blond to take your money and run, get a D800. That one stunning shot is certainly worth it. But I do wish all the shots were as stunning. Almost strangling yourself on the sidlines with an Expodisc is problematic.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful. Was this review helpful? Yes | No

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Created: 07/03/12

Tough learning curve, but the result is near medium format quality photos.

Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.

This camera, beyond low f-stops and fast shutter speeds, requires planning and knowledge of the accessories used with it. In the FX setting, image blur with high ISO, chromatic aberration and motion blur are unforgiving enemies that were more tolerated with lower pixel cameras and even in the DX setting of the D800. I have taken thousands of test shots to learn the limits of my Nikkor lens' and filters when used with the D800.

Once mastered, the quality of the photo printed as a 6'X4' photo is unparallelled. I rarely print, but when I do, it's large. I now have the choice to crop down and still be able to keep good resolution in larger prints. The details in the photos are amazing. This camera will force one to become more technically aware of equipment, setup and post processing.

You're technique will be challenged by the D800. If you are not willing to work through the learning process, there will be a question on why you purchased the camera. I found that my D700 allowed me to have a less rigid technique and still produce good shots. You will not have that with the D800; which is good if you aspire to improve your abilities.

16 of 17 people found this review helpful. Was this review helpful? Yes | No

Created: 11/10/13

A BEAST in physical built and Features. NOT for amateurs. 4 & 3/4 stars.

Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.

Definitely NOT for armatures. D800 has tons of good and useful features, difficult to master. I was a photographer in the 1960s and am now just a serious hobbyist, getting back to photography now that I am retired. My comment reflects my personal preferences. What is important to you may not be important to me and vice-verza.

To me, this camera is a BEAST in the sense of physical bulk and features. Few items I wish for this camera. Built-in GPS, different location of DOF preview button and spring-loaded "push" of the Diopter knob instead of the "pull to change". Placement of LV and other bottoms are just matter of preferences. I like the built-in eye curtain which blocks the stray light that affects metering when using remote activation of the shutter.

Picture quality depends on the lens and the various settings. It is obvious that at the highest Pixel setting, this camera could produce images suitable for larger print than the same photograph taken with a camera of lower pixel count, using the same lens, setting, lighting condition. Practical consideration: nobody can tell the difference between the photos I took with my D600 and the D800, both using the prime lenses (50mm f/1.4 and 135mm f/2.0) with both camera set at the individual camera highest image Quality and image size settings.

While Pros may favor CF over SD, I find SD cards more than sufficient for my application. In this regard, I prefer the dual slot for SD cards in the D600 over the D800's one SD and one CD card slots. CF cards are more expensive and requires an external CF card reader to transfer files to computer. I would not tie my camera to the computer with the USB cable. On the other hand, there are CF cards that has Wi-Fi transfer capability.

Not unique to D800 is the drive blade for Nikkor D lenses Autofocus. While Others may prefer the silent drive of Nikkor G lenses, I do not like to spend money for G lenses. Thom Hogan wrote article on this subject. Here is a link to Nikon body - Nikkor lens compatibility by another author: http://www.nikonians.org/revie​ws?alias=nikon-slr-camera-and-​lens-compatibility

More likely than not, the Nikon D610 (an update of the D600) would be more than sufficient for serious hobbyist but non-professional photographers.

Caveat: Since this camera is built like a Main Battle Tank, it should last and function flawlessly for years. However, avoid buying a "gray market" version IN CASE the camera needs repair for any reason. Remember, the term "gray market" applies to region where you live, not just in Canada and USA.

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