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Black Sabbath by Black Sabbath (CD, 1990, Warner Bros.)

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Black Sabbath by Black Sabbath (CD, Jan-1990, Warner Bros.)
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BLACK SABBATH - Black Sabbath CD HEAVY METAL DOOM METAL
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Black Sabbath by Black Sabbath (CD, 1990, Warner Bros.) CD & PAPER SLEEVE ONLY
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Product description
Album Features
UPC:075992718523
Artist:Black Sabbath
Format:CD
Release Year:1990
Record Label:Warner Bros.
Genre:Hard Rock, Rock & Pop
Number Of Discs:1

Track Listing
1. Black Sabbath
2. The Wizard
3. Wasp/Behind the Wall of Sleep/Bassically/N.I.B.: Behind The Wall Of Sleep / N.I.B.
4. Wicked World
5. A Bit of Finger/Sleeping Village/Warning: Warning

Details
Playing Time:40 min.
Producer:Tony Iommi, Geezer Butler, Rodger Bain
Distributor:WEA (Distributor)
Recording Type:Studio
Recording Mode:Stereo
SPAR Code:n/a

Album Notes
Black Sabbath: Geezer Butler (bass instrument); Ozzy Osbourne, Tony Iommi, Bill Ward .Personnel: Ozzy Osbourne (vocals, harmonica); Bill Ward (vocals, drums); Ira Ferguson, Tony Iommi (guitar); Peter Restey (keyboards); Bill Russell (drums).Black Sabbath's debut album is the birth of heavy metal as we now know it. Compatriots like Blue Cheer, Led Zeppelin, and Deep Purple were already setting new standards for volume and heaviness in the realms of psychedelia, blues-rock, and prog rock. Yet of these metal pioneers, Sabbath are the only one whose sound today remains instantly recognizable as heavy metal, even after decades of evolution in the genre. Circumstance certainly played some role in the birth of this musical revolution -- the sonic ugliness reflecting the bleak industrial nightmare of Birmingham; guitarist Tony Iommi's loss of two fingertips, which required him to play slower and to slacken the strings by tuning his guitar down, thus creating Sabbath's signature style. These qualities set the band apart, but they weren't wholly why this debut album transcends its clear roots in blues-rock and psychedelia to become something more. Sabbath's genius was finding the hidden malevolence in the blues, and then bludgeoning the listener over the head with it. Take the legendary album-opening title cut. The standard pentatonic blues scale always added the tritone, or flatted fifth, as the so-called "blues note"; Sabbath simply extracted it and came up with one of the simplest yet most definitive heavy metal riffs of all time. Thematically, most of heavy metal's great lyrical obsessions are not only here, they're all crammed onto side one. "Black Sabbath," "The Wizard," "Behind the Wall of Sleep," and "N.I.B." evoke visions of evil, paganism, and the occult as filtered through horror films and the writings of J.R.R. Tolkien, H.P. Lovecraft, and Dennis Wheatley. Even if the album ended here, it would still be essential listening. Unfortunately, much of side two is given over to loose blues-rock jamming learned through Cream, which plays squarely into the band's limitations. For all his stylistic innovations and strengths as a composer, Iommi isn't a hugely accomplished soloist. By the end of the murky, meandering, ten-minute cover of the Aynsley Dunbar Retaliation's "Warning," you can already hear him recycling some of the same simple blues licks he used on side one (plus, the word "warn" never even appears in the song, because Ozzy Osbourne misheard the original lyrics). (The British release included another cover, a version of Crow's "Evil Woman" that doesn't quite pack the muscle of the band's originals; the American version substituted "Wicked World," which is much preferred by fans.) But even if the seams are still showing on this quickly recorded document, Black Sabbath is nonetheless a revolutionary debut whose distinctive ideas merely await a bit more focus and development. Henceforth Black Sabbath would forge ahead with a vision that was wholly theirs. ~ Steve Huey

Black Sabbath: Ozzy Osbourne (vocals, harmonica); Tony Iommi (guitar); Geezer Butler (bass instrument); Bill Ward (drums).Black Sabbath's debut album is the birth of heavy metal as we now know it. Compatriots like Blue Cheer, Led Zeppelin, and Deep Purple were already setting new standards for volume and heaviness in the realms of psychedelia, blues-rock, and prog rock. Yet of these metal pioneers, Sabbath are the only one whose sound today remains instantly recognizable as heavy metal, even after decades of evolution in the genre. Circumstance certainly played some role in the birth of this musical revolution -- the sonic ugliness reflecting the bleak industrial nightmare of Birmingham; guitarist Tony Iommi's loss of two fingertips, which required him to play slower and to slacken the strings by tuning his guitar down, thus creating Sabbath's signature style. These qualities set the band apart, but they weren't wholly why this debut album transcends its clear roots in blues-rock and psychedelia to become something more. Sabbath's genius was finding the hidden malevolence in the blues, and then bludgeoning the listener over the head with it. Take the legendary album-opening title cut. The standard pentatonic blues scale always added the tritone, or flatted fifth, as the so-called "blues note"; Sabbath simply extracted it and came up with one of the simplest yet most definitive heavy metal riffs of all time. Thematically, most of heavy metal's great lyrical obsessions are not only here, they're all crammed onto side one. "Black Sabbath," "The Wizard," "Behind the Wall of Sleep," and "N.I.B." evoke visions of evil, paganism, and the occult as filtered through horror films and the writings of J.R.R. Tolkien, H.P. Lovecraft, and Dennis Wheatley. Even if the album ended here, it would still be essential listening. Unfortunately, much of side two is given over to loose blues-rock jamming learned through Cream, which plays squarely into the band's limitations. For all his stylistic innovations and strengths as a composer, Iommi isn't a hugely accomplished soloist. By the end of the murky, meandering, ten-minute cover of the Aynsley Dunbar Retaliation's "Warning," you can already hear him recycling some of the same simple blues licks he used on side one (plus, the word "warn" never even appears in the song, because Ozzy Osbourne misheard the original lyrics). The British release included another cover, a version of Crow's "Evil Woman" that doesn't quite pack the muscle of the band's originals. (The American version substitutes "Wicked World," which is much preferred by fans.) But even if the seams are still showing on this quickly recorded document, Black Sabbath is nonetheless a revolutionary debut whose distinctive ideas merely await a bit more focus and development. Henceforth Black Sabbath would forge ahead with a vision that was wholly theirs. ~ Steve Huey

eBay Product ID: EPID3072167

Reviews & Research

Customer Reviews

Average review score based on 17 user reviews

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Created: 07/16/08

The Foundation of Heavy Metal

Before Black Sabbath there was The Cream, Deep Purple, the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the Jeff Beck Group, Blue Cheer, Savoy Brown, Steppenwolf, Ten Years After, Led Zeppelin, and Iron Butterfly, as well as many other Heavy groups which are more obscure; so Sabbath did not invent Heavy music.

Black Sabbath pushed the Blues-/-Psychedelic Rock envelope a little bit further, though; and in a startlingly original and creative way. At the end of the day, the band had codified a new style of Rock music. Other bands started it, but Black Sabbath clarified, crystalized, and finalized it. They call it Heavy Metal.

The concept of the band was apparently inspired by some of the Gothic horror movies of the 1960's.

Their songs dealt with God, the Devil, drugs, war, the occult, monsters, love, death, fear, loneliness, vengeance, mental illness, loss, morality, and religion. Sometimes their lyrics were adolescent; sometimes brilliant. Of course not all of these topics were touched on in their first recording. One of the songs on this first release details the attempt of Satan to seduce and deceive mankind into evil, spiritual darkness, and servitude. WICKED WORLD deals with a world gone wrong, and man's moral and social irresponsibility.

As for Black Sabbath's early MUSIC, and more specifically this release:

THIS IS GENIUS !


The musical roots of the band are Blues, Hard Rock, and to a lesser extent, Jazz.
There are slight traces of Pop and Folk throughout their later work; and possibly even a very, very slight Classical influence in a couple of songs.

The whole band is very inventive, and great guitar and bass motifs, riffs, and solos abound amidst fantastic drumming. Ozzy Osbourne was young and strong when he sang these songs; and his voice was full and powerful before the ravages of time and abuse took their toll. As a singer he has charisma to burn.

Some of the musical ideas simply have to be heard to be believed; and even the cover photos are beautiful (although the idea to color the skin of the lovely young woman who adorns the front cover green was a lapse of aesthetic judgement in my book).

Highest Recommendation !

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Created: 10/15/10

This one started it all!

This is one of the best albums ever made. It was the start of heavy metal as we know it today. This is a must have for any Black Sabbath or Ozzy fan. It's fun to listed to Ozzy sing almost 40 years ago. Great deep dark instrumentals also.

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Created: 10/09/10

Great band, Great song lineup. Some of Sabbaths best!

Great songs on this CD. Definately a classic, without a doubt! One of the best songs on this lineup is a bit of finger. One of the best 13 minute songs you would want to jam too. I highly recommend it to anyone who is a Sabbath listener.

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Created: 04/22/08

What in the world?

It was the early 1970's my older brother and his best friend had barricaded themself into my brothers room. I could hear music coming through the door, but nothing like I had ever heard before. What the Heck were they doing in there? as this Devilish music played on. Once Mom heard it, the record playing was over! my brother was grounded and his best friend banned from the house for devil worshiping. I had too have more! From that day forward Black Sabbath was forever banned from our house, Drugs and Devil my mother blamed for all mine and brother short comings, and Black Sabbath was the leader of the pack. If you dont have a copy get one, if you already have one, save it! we'll be playing it LOUD in Hell someday!

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Created: 07/18/11

BUY IT

Yes, I would recommend this product to a friend.

Such a great record. The title track Black Sabbath is still just as frightning as ever and Geezer's bass solo before N.I.B. still sounds good after all this time. Ozzy's voice improved a few years later but still gold

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